Community College vs Four Year College: What’s the Difference?

The+Struggle+of+Seniors+during+the+College+App+Season
Back to Article
Back to Article

Community College vs Four Year College: What’s the Difference?

The Struggle of Seniors during the College App Season

The Struggle of Seniors during the College App Season

Photo Courtesy of Wikipedia

The Struggle of Seniors during the College App Season

Photo Courtesy of Wikipedia

Photo Courtesy of Wikipedia

The Struggle of Seniors during the College App Season

Nicole Ginaven, Staff Writer

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






As the due dates of college applications come closer, seniors must decide whether they want to apply to four year colleges or community college.  There are several differences between the both of them. So, which one should you apply to?

The problem is, there is no correct answer to that question.  Both community college and four year colleges have advantages and disadvantages for everyone; however, one may work better for you than the other.

Four year colleges are the obvious pick for many students, since you apply once, get in, and stay there to receive your bachelor’s degree.  You get to live away from your parents and become independent. However, the steep prices cause many families difficulty, leading to the students to take out student loans, and then have them looming over their heads for a long time afterwards, until they are finally paid off.

Many people turn their nose up at community college because it is not the more glamorous of the college options.  But community college is vastly cheaper than a four year college, and is usually cheap enough that most people can handle the prices.  Even if you cannot, financial aid is available, and if you have to take out a loan it would be much less than a four year college loan.  Also, once the two years of community college are completed, you can apply to a four year college, and nothing from high school goes on the application.  The only downside for some people is, you would have to live at home still, and some students, and parents, do not want that.

One thing that stays the same for both colleges, though, is that they both require effort on the part of the student.  If you do not put effort into your work and your studies, you will not do well, and it does not matter what college you attend, that applies to all of them.

So, the choice of community college versus four year college belongs to you- only you can make the decision of which will work best for you.