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A Crash Victim’s Story

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A Crash Victim’s Story

The Every 15 Minutes crash scene triggered emotions that people often repress

The Every 15 Minutes crash scene triggered emotions that people often repress

Photo courtesy of Lance Sanchez

The Every 15 Minutes crash scene triggered emotions that people often repress

Photo courtesy of Lance Sanchez

Photo courtesy of Lance Sanchez

The Every 15 Minutes crash scene triggered emotions that people often repress

Maxine Vivanco, Staff Writer

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On Thursday, January 31, Every 15 Minutes took place at Los Alamitos High School. The event, which happens every two years, is used as a way of raising awareness on the negative impacts of driving while intoxicated. On that day, as you may know, every 15 minutes a student’s name is announced saying that they passed away in an alcohol related accident. A police officer and the Grim Reaper then comes to that person’s class, reads their obituary and, takes them away.

Later in the day, students who participate in this activity stage a drunk driving accident on campus showing the dangerous effects of driving drunk. Every 15 Minutes is very emotional for students but, those involved are affected on a deeper level.

Griffins who chose to participate were told to keep their part in the activity a secret from teachers, friends, or siblings they have at school, depriving them of the opportunity to talk to those they are close to about their feelings towards this particular day.

Grace Coil, a senior who participated in the crash scene, expressed, “I had a really hard time keeping it a secret with the people that I was close to because I felt like I was lying to them.” Grace had to keep her involvement with Every 15 Minutes a secret from her sister, who is a freshman.

Participants were not only tasked with the responsibility to keep their involvement a secret. They also had to remain respectful and keep their emotions in check while getting taken away. “It hit us all hard we just all dealt with it in… a joking matter” Grace stated. After leaving school, the victims were taken to a courthouse where they sat in a room and listened to their parents (because they were not allowed to see their parents until the next morning) “fight for us,” as Grace puts it. After they left the courthouse, they were taken to a morgue where they saw their own dead bodies and attend their funeral. At the end of the day the victims were taken back to a hotel waiting to see their family in the morning at the reunion assembly.

Maxine Vivanco, Staff Writer

Maxine Vivanco has always been a curios person. She loves spending time at the beach with friends. Maxine started writing on her own about two years ago...

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